Actor Q&A: Jacob Mundell

Jacob is playing Trinculo in The Tempest. He was a member of National Players Tour 65, where he played Macbeth (Macbeth), Duke/Balthazar/Pinch (The Comedy of Errors), and Perimedes (Odyssey).

Jacob Mundell as the title role in Macbeth

Jacob Mundell as the title role in Macbeth

Tell me about your decision to join National Players.

I joined National Players because before last year I was more well-traveled outside of the country than I was inside of the country. It’s amazing for a young actor because this is one of the longest contracts that’s available. I was so relieved that last year it stepped up to a three show season, because it gives you more challenge, variety, responsibility. You get three credits, a year of work, and you get nine months to work on roles that you improve upon as time goes by.

What’s the most bizarre story from your tour?

I didn’t want to think that I would be subject to the Macbeth curse. I thought I would get away with it. I totally didn’t. The night before our first venue I went jogging at night and sprained my ankle—and that was before we performed the Scottish play on Friday the 13th. Everyone pooled in all their prescription pain killers and I did the show high on pain killers. And right in the middle of “Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow,” a bat flew at me, just swooped at me, and I had to dodge it onstage and incorporate it into the performance. But now I have my own curse story.

What’s the biggest lesson you learned on tour?

You can’t plan anything. That’s an acting lesson that I thought Ii had under wraps, that you have to willingly embrace the moments as they come, but that’s a life lesson too: You have to have an extreme amount of emotional flexibility… Facing the coming avalanche with arms open wide isn’t just an acting lesson, but a life lesson. Continue reading

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Actor Q&A: Julie-Ann Elliott

Julie-Ann Elliott is portraying Ariel in The Tempest. She was a National Player for Tour 44, where she played Rosalind in As You Like It and Ma Joad in Grapes of Wrath.

Julie-Ann Elliott as Ma Joad

Julie-Ann Elliott as Ma Joad

Tell me about your decision to join National Players. 

There were two reasons I wanted  to go on tour. I was in the graduate program at Catholic University, and Bill Graham was head of the MFA acting program and chair of the department at the time. One of the reasons I went to grad school was for classical training, and while we did have a classical acting class, it didn’t feel like enough. It seemed intimidating and untouchable because it was that thing that I had never done. I was also very close with some people who had been on tour prior to coming to Catholic, so I had all of their fraternal stories which seemed wonderful and inviting, and you were a part of this huge brother-sisterhood, and I wanted to be a part of that.

What was it like playing two roles back-to-back for a year, and did you get the training that you wanted?

I feel like I did. I had some classical training at Catholic, and Mr. Graham was our acting coach for the Players as well, but this was much more intensive. So yes, you have to grow, and you have to know what you’re doing enough to keep within the boundaries of the direction. You have to know two versions of both shows, so you have to know the text inside and out and be able to make the jumps you need to. To me, it was more important to think about how to approach the characters and tell the story. You need to know what the language means and you need to make it feel like your own, and I was more concerned with that than scanning and marking.

What’s the biggest lesson you learned as a Player?

The actors are loading and unloading the truck, and we all had to put the set together, we all had to screw the lights on the truss, so everybody is a part of the whole process. One of the big things is learning how to be a part of a team, knowing you’ve got a job to do and everybody has to do their part. I’ve gone into theaters with bigger budgets and with people who’ve always worked equity or don’t remember not working equity, and there’s an expectation that things will always be taken care of. Although I often have those expectations myself, being a Player puts you in  the mindset of “We have a job to do and we’re going to make it work.”  Continue reading